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(Photo from ProstoSvet/Adobe Stock)

Regenerative medicine uses 3D-printed materials to create and restore tissues and organs, but these materials can have microscopic manufacturing flaws that jeopardize the safety and reliability of these products.

  • Callie Higgins, materials research engineer at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), developed a technique to correct these flaws, which she said involves using light to solidify liquids and build three-dimensional structures with a series of two-dimensional layers.
  • Higgins said her team is working with 3D Systems and United Therapeutics to help them understand how to print an artificial lung. She said industry is working at an “unbelievable” pace to be able to print human tissue and organs and estimated this capability could exist in about 10 years.
  • Other applications for this type of 3D printing include automotive parts and medical supplies, as demonstrated during the Covid-19 pandemic with the fabrication of nose swabs, face shield pieces and other materials, said Higgins.

Watch the full interview:

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January 2022
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