EPA Office of Inspector General releases Flint water report

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Charles Brunton, program analyst at the EPA Office of the Inspector General, discusses the second IG report about the Flint Water Crisis, and why the lack of management controls played a part in delaying solutions.


As the Flint water crisis continues, a new report from the Environmental Protection Agency’s inspector general says that management issues may have prevented those in the Michigan city from receiving clean water. Charles Brunton, program analyst at the EPA Office of the Inspector General, said that there was a lack of management controls at EPA Region 5, which covers most of the Midwest.

 

“Essentially there was a lack of oversight roles and responsibilities. There was a lack of clear communication between the EPA and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality,” Brunton said. “There was no risk assessment in place at region 5, and there was a lack of clear oversight tools and authorities at their disposal in terms of their usage.”

 

Brunton said that with the high-profile nature of the Flint case, their goal with the report was to present the case as close to the truth as possible.

 

“We really just hone down on our testimonial, documentary evidence and analysis. We conduct numerous interviews and let the data speak for itself. We provide that analysis and we issue the report and let the report speak for itself,” Brunton told Government Matters.